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Ecology Fair University of Minnesota Monarch Lab

Abstracts from Other 2012

Other
(Various), MN

Year: 2012
Teacher(s): Karla Bisco, sevve stember

Belt it Out, Big Boy?

Django L

When we observed crickets this fall, it seemed like the larger crickets chirped more than the medium or small crickets. In this experiment, we are testing the way that cricket size affects the amount of times a cricket chirps. We placed small crickets in one bin, medium crickets in a second bin, and large crickets in a third bin. We listened to cricket chirps during one-minute periods.


Climbing Cockroaches

Mercades L

In observing deaths head cockroaches, we noticed they were trying to climb the sides of the plastic bin. They couldn’t move up the sides of the bin. We wondered if a sandpaper surface would allow them to climb. We designed an experiment that covered the wall surfaces of the bin with three different types of sandpaper in order to see if they could climb with different textures.


Cockroaches in the House!

Linnea B

This fall we observed Madagascar hissing cockroaches moving under shelter. We wondered why the cockroaches would go under the shelters, and we wondered if temperature would affect the number of cockroaches under the shelter. To test this question, we placed 3 bins (with the same contents) in three different environments—cool room, warm room, and a hot room.


Cricket Real Estate

Carolann Z

This fall we observed crickets and noticed that crickets would interact with a shelter (crumpled paper) in their bin. We saw that the crickets put their heads into the shelter. Often, we could still see their abdomens. These observations made us wonder how does the size of shelter in the bin affect the number of visible crickets. To test our question we set up three bins with different sizes of shelters.


Do Dubias Dig Dirt?

Azrael T

This fall we observed Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and we noticed the cockroaches were on a single substrate—sand. We wondered if the type of substrate would affect the location of dubias, which are another type of cockroach. To test our question, we placed cockroaches in a bin with 3 different substrates—sand, soil, and wood chips.


Hot versus Cold: Battle of the Chirps

Elias K

This fall we observed crickets, and we noticed a lot of chirping at room temperature. This observation made us wonder if the temperature of a room affects the number of times crickets chirp in one minute. To test this question, we put 3 bins in 3 different room—a cool room, warm room, and a hot room.


Hungry, Hungry Dubias

Noah K

This fall we observed cockroaches, and we noticed that some cockroaches did not eat as much as others. This observation made us wonder if the type of food made available to the cockroaches would affect their eating. To test our question, we designed an experiment using dubias in which these cockroaches could select from 3 types of food.


Sing it, Cricket!

Jasper L

This fall we observed crickets, and we learned ways to tell some of the different features between the male and female. We also learned that males chirp to attract females. Learning about crickets made us wonder how the amount of females affects the number of times male crickets chirp. To test this question, we set up 3 bins with 4 males in each bin. In each of the three bins, there was a different number of females (0, 2, and 4).


Super Substrates!

Jaidynn A

This fall we observed crickets, and we noticed that most of them moved in different substrates. We wondered if the type of substrate would affect the location of the crickets. We designed an experiment where the crickets could move between 3 types of substrate—rock, soil, and sand.


This is no Roach Motel!

Levi H

This fall we observed Madagascar hissing cockroaches, and we noticed that they went under a shelter a lot. This behavior made us wonder how the size of shelter would affect the number of visible cockroaches. To test our question, we put a different size shelter in 3 different bins—small, medium, larger.


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