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Ecology Fair University of Minnesota Monarch Lab

Abstracts from Weaver Lake Elementary 2009

Weaver Lake Elementary
15900 Weaver Lake Road
Maple Grove, MN 55311

Year: 2009
Teacher(s): Gina Keenan, Laurie toll, Lisa Koch, Mary Moran, Matt MacPhail, Richard Veth

Bess Beetle Mania

Victoria S, Ashley V

We wondered which substrate Bess Beetles prefer: wood, sand, soil, or leaves? Our investigation was designed to test their preference.


Bess Beetle Rampage

Abby M, Ashia A, Saarah M

We were curious to see if Bess Beetles could move faster while moving over different substrates. We designed an investigation to test this.


Bess Beetle: Moist vs. Dry

Reem A, Amira G

We wanted to find out whether Bess Beetles preferred to eat moist or dry wood. We conducted an investigation to find out their preference.


Bess Beetles Fly Away

Meghan L, Danielle H

Could you imagine spending almost a year inside a plant? That's what a goldenrod gall fly does. A gall is a bump that forms when an insect larva irritates a plant. The insect larva stays inside the gall until it emerges as an adult insect. The goldenrod gall fly lays its eggs on the stem of goldenrod in the spring and the larva spends 50 weeks inside the gall until it emerges early the next spring. When we dissected the goldenrod gall we discovered that the goldenrod gall fly makes an escape tunnels that will be used by the mature insect the following spring. This experiment tried to figure out if a fly larva will build its escape tunnel in a particular place in the gall. We thought the goldenrod gall fly would prefer to build its escape tunnel in the lower hemisphere of the gall. We discovered that 66.5% percent of all galls dissected had larva escape tunnels at the top of the goldenrod ball gall.


Bess Tow Trucks

Thomas L, Alex Y, Ben B

Could you imagine spending almost a year inside a plant?  That's what a goldenrod gall fly does.  A gall is a bump that forms when an insect larva irritates a plant. The insect larva stays inside the gall until it emerges as an adult insect. The goldenrod gall fly lays its eggs on the stem of goldenrod in the spring and the larva spends 50 weeks inside the gall until it emerges early the next spring. When we dissected the goldenrod gall we discovered that the goldenrod gall fly makes an escape tunnels that will be used by the mature insect the following spring. This experiment tried to figure out if a fly larva will build its escape tunnel in a particular place in the gall. We thought the goldenrod gall fly would prefer to build its escape tunnel in the lower hemisphere of the gall.  We discovered that 66.5% percent of all galls dissected had larva escape tunnels at the top of the goldenrod ball gall.


Best of Both Beetles

Nicole R, Sergio N, Cassie H, Stephanie Z, Emily J

Could you imagine spending almost a year inside a plant?  That's what a goldenrod gall fly does.  A gall is a bump that forms when an insect larva irritates a plant. The insect larva stays inside the gall until it emerges as an adult insect. The goldenrod gall fly lays its eggs on the stem of goldenrod in the spring and the larva spends 50 weeks inside the gall until it emerges early the next spring. When we dissected the goldenrod gall we discovered that the goldenrod gall fly makes an escape tunnels that will be used by the mature insect the following spring. This experiment tried to figure out if a fly larva will build its escape tunnel in a particular place in the gall. We thought the goldenrod gall fly would prefer to build its escape tunnel in the lower hemisphere of the gall.  We discovered that 66.5% percent of all galls dissected had larva escape tunnels at the top of the goldenrod ball gall.


Cranky Cockroaches

Natalie R, Emily S

We observed that Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches turned over quickly when they were on their backs. That led us to test how long it would take them to turn over on different surfaces.


Crazy Cockroach

Cisco C, Grant D, Firomsaa D

We observed Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches to see if they were more active in light or in darkness. Our group designed an investigation that measured their activity.


Crazy Cockroach Climbers

Darartu G, Fernanda L, Emma F

We investigated the climbing abilities of cockroaches by having them climb surfaces with different textures.


Dancing Cockroaches

Abby E, Jenay F, Emily H

We wondered if cockroaches would move differently in response to different music styles. We designed an investigation to observe their movement.


Hercuroaches

Aleck B, Tommy C

We observed Madagascar Hissing Cockroaches and noticed that they were small. We also saw them moving on different surfaces We wondered whether the surface they were on would affect how much weight they would pull, so we designed an investigation to test that question.


Hiding Hoppers

Emma N, Sareri P

We observed crickets in our classroom, and saw they spent a lot of time under the paper in their container. We wondered if they preferred black paper or light paper. We conducted an investigation to determine if they had a preference.


Jumping Crickets

Brandon T, Emmanuel G

We used different sized crickets to see if size affected the height of their jump.


Magnificent Millipede Maze

Milena C, Michaela G, Leonie B, Anna J

We put millipedes through three mazes (easy, medium, hard) to see if they could complete them.


Marvelous Millipedes

Kasey N, Riley S, Lemia N, Cassie C

We investigated how millipedes reacted to music played at different volumes.


Mile Moving Millipedes

Sayyeda K, Andrea L

We wondered if longer millipedes were faster or slower that shorter millipedes. Our investigation tested their speeds.


Millipedes on the Run

Lesley K, Priyanka B, Estefania F

We put different size millipedes on a race track to see how size affects their speed.


Moving Millipedes

Ethan T, Ellie B

(No abstract submitted.)


Mr. Millipede

Adam W, Noah F

We observed millipedes digging. We devised an investigation to decide what substrate they preferred to dig in.


Music vs. Millipedes

Maleah B, Alexandra O, Julene M

We investigated how the type of music affects millipedes’ behavior.


Roach Screamers

Fischer J, James L

Our group spent a lot of time observing the Madagascar Hissing Cockroach, and we were interested in their hissing. We wondered if there was something we could construct or use to test the volume of their hiss. We designed our own device to test this idea out.


Spider Crickets

Teshawn K

We were curious to find out how long crickets could hang on to paper at different angles. We timed three different crickets at three different angles.


The Scavenging Ants

Tony S, Kameron C

We found out which types of surfaces ants prefer to spend their time in.


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